Computer security news, opinion, advice and research from anti-virus experts & New Technologies for Computer Security, Sharing the crazy for the betterment of online security

Mathematics supports a new way to classify viruses based on structure

Mathematics supports a new way to classify viruses based on structure
Professor Robert Sinclair at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and Professor Dennis Bamford and Dr. Janne Ravantti from the University of Helsinki have found new evidence to support a classification system for viruses based on viral structure. The team developed a new highly-sensitive computational prototype tool, and used it to detect similarities in the genetic code of viruses with similar outer structures, that conventional tools have failed to detect,…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
351 Hits
0 Comments

Cameras can steal data from computer hard drive LED lights, study finds

Cameras can steal data from computer hard drive LED lights, study finds
Researchers have found that once malware is on a computer, it can indirectly control a hard-drive (HDD) activity LED, turning it on and off rapidly (thousands of flickers per second) -- a rate that exceeds the human visual perception capabilities. As a result, highly sensitive information can be encoded and leaked over the fast LED signals, which are received and recorded by remote cameras or light sensors.…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
78 Hits
0 Comments

Will androids dream of quantum sheep?

Will androids dream of quantum sheep?
The word 'replicant' evokes thoughts of a sci-fi world where society has replaced common creatures with artificial machines that replicate their behaviour. Now researchers from Singapore have shown that if such machines are ever created, they'll run more efficiently if they harness quantum theory to respond to the environment. This follows the findings of a team from the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), published 10 February in npj Quantum Information. The team investigated 'input-output p…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
348 Hits
0 Comments

Simulated ransomware attack shows vulnerability of industrial controls

Simulated ransomware attack shows vulnerability of industrial controls
Cybersecurity researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new form of ransomware that can take over control of a simulated water treatment plant. After gaining access, they were able to command programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to shut valves, increase the amount of chlorine added to water, and display false readings. The simulated attack was designed to highlight vulnerabilities in the control systems used to operate industrial facilities such as manufacturing plants…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
125 Hits
0 Comments

Protecting bulk power systems from hackers

Protecting bulk power systems from hackers
Reliability measures of electrical grid has risen to a new norm as it involves physical security and cybersecurity. Threats to either can trigger instability, leading to blackouts and economic losses. New research led by scientists from Michigan Technological University delves into so-called "nightmare" scenarios where hackers exploit security weaknesses and execute a disruptive plan of cyberattacks. The journal IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid published their work recently. Lead author Chee-Wooi…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
160 Hits
0 Comments

Taming complexity

Taming complexity
Classical physics offers a relatively easy approach to describing how objects move in our everyday world. But in the realm of quantum physics, this task is much more challenging. Determining how a quantum particle behaves requires the use of the wave equation devised by Erwin Schrödinger, which is more difficult to solve than classic mechanical equations. Limits of supercomputers The situation becomes particularly tricky when studying the behaviour of multiple, interacting objects rather than ju…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
544 Hits
0 Comments

Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats

Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats
As we saw during the 2016 US election, protecting traditional computer systems, which use zeros and ones, from hackers is not a perfect science. Now consider the complex world of quantum computing, where bits of information can simultaneously hold multiple states beyond zero and one, and the potential threats become even trickier to tackle. Even so, researchers at the University of Ottawa have uncovered clues that could help administrators protect quantum computing networks from external attacks…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
106 Hits
0 Comments

Making distributed storage highly consistent

One of the fundamental open challenges in computer science is effective data storage. The socio-economic value and scale of information increases day by day and researchers at the Madrid research institute IMDEA Networks have been working to identify ways to ensure not only that digitally stored data endures, but also that it is readily available, reliable and, above all, consistent. In recent years, the massive generation of data coupled with frequent storage failures has increased the populari…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
169 Hits
0 Comments

Your Android device's Pattern Lock can be cracked within five attempts

The popular Pattern Lock system used to secure millions of Android phones can be cracked within just five attempts -- and more complicated patterns are the easiest to crack, security experts reveal. Pattern Lock is a security measure that protects devices, such as mobile phones or tablets, and which is preferred by many to PIN codes or text passwords. It is used by around 40 per cent of Android device owners. In order to access a device's functions and content, users must first draw a pattern on…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
127 Hits
0 Comments

Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat. "The cost and complexity of traditional encryption solutions prevent them being directly applied to telemedicine or mobile healthcare. Those systems are gradually replacing clinic-centered healthcare, and we wanted to find a unique solution to protect sensitive personal health data with something simple, available and cost-effect…
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
142 Hits
0 Comments