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Setting up a decoy network may help deflect a hacker's hits

Computer networks may never float like a butterfly, but Penn State information scientists suggest that creating nimble networks that can sense jabs from hackers could help deflect the stinging blows of those attacks. "Because of the static nature of a computer network, the attacker has a time advantage," said Dinghao Wu, assistant professor of information sciences and technology. "Hackers can spend a month, two months, six months or more just studying the network and finding vulnerabilities. Whe…
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Are fitness trackers fit for security?

They may look like a normal watch but are capable to do much more than just showing the time: So called fitness trackers are collecting data on their users' lifestyle and health status on a large scale helping them with training or losing weight. Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi, system security professor at the cybersecurity profile area (CYSEC) of TU Darmstadt and his team investigated fraud opportunities with fitness trackers and detected serious security flaws. The popularity of these devices is constantl…
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New chip could bring highest level of encryption to any mobile device

Random number generators are crucial to the encryption that protects our privacy and security when engaging in digital transactions such as buying products online or withdrawing cash from an ATM. For the first time, engineers have developed a fast random number generator based on a quantum mechanical process that could deliver the world's most secure encryption keys in a package tiny enough to use in a mobile device. In The Optical Society's journal, Optica, the researchers report on their fully…
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Smartphone hacks 3-D printer by measuring 'leaked' energy and acoustic waves

Smartphone hacks 3-D printer by measuring
The ubiquity of smartphones and their sophisticated gadgetry make them an ideal tool to steal sensitive data from 3-D printers. That's according to a new University at Buffalo study that explores security vulnerabilities of 3-D printing, also called additive manufacturing, which analysts say will become a multibillion-dollar industry employed to build everything from rocket engines to heart valves. "Many companies are betting on 3-D printing to revolutionize their businesses, but there are still…
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Vulnerabilities found in cars connected to smartphones

Vulnerabilities found in cars connected to smartphones
Many of today's automobiles leave the factory with secret passengers: prototype software features that are disabled but that can be unlocked by clever drivers. In what is believed to be the first comprehensive security analysis of its kind, Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and a group of students at George Mason University found vulnerabilities in MirrorLink, a system of rules that allow vehicles to communicate with …
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One in two users click on links from unknown senders

Most people know that e-mails and Facebook messages from unknown senders can contain dangerous links. However, many users still click on them -- and Dr. Zinaida Benenson from the Chair of Computer Science 1 at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has investigated why. The results of the experiment were clear: up to 56 percent of e-mail recipients and around 40 percent of facebook users clicked on a link from an unknown sender although they knew of the risks of their computer b…
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Researchers find vulnerabilities in iPhone, iPad operating system

An international team of computer science researchers has identified serious security vulnerabilities in the iOS -- the operating system used in Apple's iPhone and iPad devices. The vulnerabilities make a variety of attacks possible. "There's been a lot of research done on Android's operating systems, so we wanted to take a closer look at Apple's iOS," says William Enck, an associate professor of computer science at North Carolina State University and co-author of a paper describing the work. "O…
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Cybersecurity student researches how to keep cars safe from hacking

In 2015, two researchers remotely hacked a Jeep Cherokee being driven by a reporter who documented how the researchers controlled everything from the car's radio and media console to its brakes and steering. For Dr. Shucheng Yu, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, the exercise demonstrated how vulnerable smart cars with GPS, Bluetooth, and internet connections are to cyberattacks. "These cars have become the trend of the future," Yu said. "The…
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People disregard security warnings on computers because they come at bad times, study finds

Software developers listen up: if you want people to pay attention to your security warnings on their computers or mobile devices, you need to make them pop up at better times. A new study from BYU, in collaboration with Google Chrome engineers, finds the status quo of warning messages appearing haphazardly -- while people are typing, watching a video, uploading files, etc. -- results in up to 90 percent of users disregarding them. Researchers found these times are less effective because of "dua…
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RetroScope opens doors to the past in smart phone investigations

Purdue University researchers are working on a new technique that could aid law enforcement in gathering data from smart phones when investigating crimes. A research team led by Professor Dongyan Xu, a computer science professor and interim executive director of Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security, and fellow Purdue computer science professor Xiangyu Zhang will detail findings of the technique, called RetroScope, during the USENIX Security Symposium in Austin,…
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