Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye drops

Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye drops
Quantum dots are transforming electronic displays on TVs and tablets. But now, one group reports in ACS Nano that these tiny structures may someday provide relief for eye infections resulting from contact lens wear, trauma or some types of surgeries. Every year, roughly a million people in the U.S. develop an eye infection known as bacterial keratitis, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The infection causes the cornea to become inflamed, and if left untreated, can …
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Volvo is first major carmaker to forgo traditional engines (Update)

Volvo is first major carmaker to forgo traditional engines (Update)
A Volvo XC 90 during an interview with Volvo Cars CEO Hakan Samuelsson at Volvo Cars Showroom in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, July 5, 2017. Samuelsson said that all Volvo cars will be electric or hybrid within two years. The Chinese-owned automotive group plans to phase out the conventional car engine. (Jonas Ekströmer/TT via AP) Volvo will begin producing electric motors on all its ca…
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Molecular electronics scientists shatter 'impossible' record of rectification rate

Molecular electronics scientists shatter
An international research team that includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco, Damien Thompson of the University of Limerick and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore has cracked an important limitation that for nearly 20 years has prevented the practical use of molecular diodes. Electrical circuits are the basic building blocks of modern electronics, with components that control the flow of current. One of those components is the diode, which allo…
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Protecting astronauts from radiation in space

Protecting astronauts from radiation in space
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have designed a new nano material that can reflect or transmit light on demand with temperature control, opening the door to technology that protects astronauts in space from harmful radiation. Lead researcher Dr Mohsen Rahmani from ANU said the material was so thin that hundreds of layers could fit on the tip of a needle and could be applied to any surface, including spacesuits. "Our invention has a lot of potential applications, such as pr…
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Wearable electronics: Superstretchable, supercompressible supercapacitors

Wearable electronics: Superstretchable, supercompressible supercapacitors
Flexible, wearable electronics require equally flexible, wearable power sources. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have introduced an extraordinarily stretchable and compressible polyelectrolyte which, in combination with carbon nanotube composite paper electrodes, forms a supercapacitor that can be stretched to 1000 percent in length and compressed to 50 percent in thickness with even gaining, not losing capacity. Supercapacitors bridge the gap between batteries, which are me…
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Quantum probes dramatically improve detection of nuclear spins

Quantum probes dramatically improve detection of nuclear spins
Researchers at the University of Melbourne have demonstrated a way to detect nuclear spins in molecules non-invasively, providing a new tool for biotechnology and materials science. Important research in medicine and biology relies on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, but until now, it has been limited in spatial resolution and typically requires powerful microwave fields. A team led by Professor Lloyd Hollenberg at the University of Melbourne has used a quantum probe to perform mic…
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3D-printed robot enters battle against cancer (w/video)

3D-printed robot enters battle against cancer (w/video)
Posted: Jul 03, 2017 (Nanowerk News) The Stormram 4, as the robot is named, is made from 3D-printed plastic and is driven by air pressure. The advantage of plastic is that the robot can be used in an MRI scanner. Carrying out a biopsy (removing a piece of tissue) during a breast cancer scan in an MRI significantly increases accuracy. The robot won a prestigious award during the Surgical Robotic Challenge at the international Hamlyn Symposium in London…
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Tiny 'motors' are driven by light

Tiny
Science fiction is full of fanciful devices that allow light to interact forcefully with matter, from light sabers to photon-drive rockets. In recent years, science has begun to catch up; some results hint at interesting real-world interactions between light and matter at atomic scales, and researchers have produced devices such as optical tractor beams, tweezers, and vortex beams. Now, a team at MIT and elsewhere has pushed through another boundary in the quest for such exotic contraptions, by …
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Miniature technology, big hope for disease detection

Miniature technology, big hope for disease detection
The field of medicine is always on the lookout for better disease diagnostic tools -- simpler, faster, and cheaper technologies to enhance patient treatment and outcomes. Currently, microfluidic bioassay devices are the preferred diagnostic tools that allow clinicians to measure the concentration of disease biomarkers within a patient's biological sample, such as blood. They can indicate the likelihood of a disease based on a comparison of the biomarker concentration in the sample relative to th…
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New method of measurement could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors

New method of measurement could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors
A new method for measuring extremely tiny objects could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors for use in fields including medical research and gas detection. Research at the University of Waterloo found that nanoscale devices using electromagnetism would be sensitive enough to determine the mass of viruses a hundred billion times lighter than a strand of human hair. "Medical researchers would finally have a more accurate tool for detecting viruses and bacteria, and that could lead to better cli…
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