Oppo is all set to enter the Indian market


India seems to be attracting a ton of tech companies of late, partly because of its young and educated population and a burgeoning middle class that’s ready to consume almost everything that comes to the market. The latest company to join this list is Oppo, the Chinese smartphone maker that wants to make the most of the opportunities available in this country.

According to media reports, Oppo plans to move its cloud service locations to India. This move is not just to better cater to the Indian consumers, but also to comply with the latest orders from the Indian IT ministry that wants Chinese companies to keep Indian data within its own territory.

This requirement has come in the wake of security questions in pre-loaded apps that are installed on these smartphone handsets. Though companies, including domestic smartphone producers, are waiting for clarification from the IT ministry on the security guidelines, it is largely expected that the government would want data to stay within its own country.

This is not so new considering that Germany and other countries have also brought in such territorial restrictions with a view to protect the safety of users within their respective countries.

To proactively comply with these yet-to-be-announced restrictions, Oppo has decided to open cloud services within India to store and manage the data of its Indian users.

Another Chinese smartphone manufacturing company called Vivo is planning to open cloud centers in India for the same reason.

Currently, Vivo and Oppo and the third and fourth largest producers of smartphone handsets in India, based on their market share. Both these companies though have refused to give out the exact details of their launch.

To give you a perspective, Amazon Web Services and Azure are the two leading cloud service providers in the world and both have a presence in India. Others like Google and IBM are looking for a slice in the Indian cloud market, so it’ll be interesting to see if Oppo and Vivo can make any in-roads in this highly competitive market or if they will use these services simply to cater to their own clients.

Either way, this would a cost-effective and long-term solution for both countries, considering the stand-off that’s been happening between India and China in the remote region of Doklam. Though none of the industry experts or political analysts expect a war, there’s a higher chance for the Indian government to put pressure on Chinese companies to comply with its security protocols.

Anyway, moving cloud centers shouldn’t be so expensive too and the entire shift can be done within a span of two to three weeks, according to cloud experts.

The positive side is that both such moves can bring more jobs for Indians, and that’s also something that the government would look into.

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